Available Category 1 PhD projects - Humanities, education, psychology, music, business, law & social sciences

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Chief Investigator

Project title

Project description

Preferred educational background

Professor Paul Dux

p.dux@psy.uq.edu.au

Neurophysiological predictors of brain stimulation outcomes

This project aims to determine the cognitive and neurophysiological factors that predict an individual’s response to non-invasive brain stimulation used to target learning and executive function processes. Stimulation methods show immense promise for elucidating the causal neural substrates of cognition, and for enhancing performance in a range of applied settings. However, there are large individual differences in response to such interventions. Using advanced imaging techniques, the project aims to provide comprehensive insights into the determinants of these individual differences. Outcomes and benefits include identifying brain characteristics that determine stimulation efficacy and informing the design of protocols for applied use.

Applications will be judged on a competitive basis taking into account the applicant's previous academic record, publication record, honours and awards, and employment history.

A working knowledge of cognitive psychology, specifically: attention, decision-making, ageing, training, modelling and cognitive neuroscience methods would be of benefit to someone working on this project.

The applicant will demonstrate academic achievement in the field(s) of psychology and cognitive neuroscience and the potential for scholastic success.

A background or knowledge of psychology and cognitive neuroscience is highly desirable.

*The successful candidate must commence by Research Quarter 1, 2022. You should apply at least 3 months prior to the research quarter commencement date. International applicants may need to apply much earlier for visa reasons.

Dr Zoe Staines

z.staines@uq.edu.au

Policy and program responses to unemployment in remote Australia: considering alternatives to workfare

This PhD scholarship is part of an ARC DECRA project, which explores the effects of changing employment and social security administration policies (including 'welfare to work' or 'workfare' policies) in remote Australian communities. These policies, which include the current Community Development Programme (CDP), predominantly affect Indigenous Australians and have not yielded positive outcomes to date. The project seeks to produce empirical evidence regarding the impacts of these policies, as well as the potential impacts of future alternatives (for example, alternatives to workfare, such as a Basic Income or Job Guarantee). The PhD student would work closely with their advisory team to negotiate the details of their own specific project, which relates to and sits within the scope of the DECRA.  

The successful applicant would enrol through the School of Social Science.

Applications will be judged on a competitive basis taking into account the applicant's previous academic record, publication record, honours and awards, and employment history.

A working knowledge of welfare-to-work or 'workfare' policy approaches, including jobseeker 'activation' and welfare conditionality, and/or alternatives such as basic income or job guarantee would be of benefit to someone working on this project.

The applicant will demonstrate academic achievement in the field(s) of Sociology, Social Policy, Criminology and the potential for scholastic success.

*The successful candidate must commence by Research Quarter 3, 2021. You should apply at least 3 months prior to the research quarter commencement date. International applicants may need to apply much earlier for visa reasons.

Professor Julie Henry

julie.henry@uq.edu.au

Reducing social frailty in late adulthood

An exciting opportunity is available to work with an outstanding multidisciplinary team working in the fields of cognitive ageing, frailty, social neuroscience and allied health. The project focuses on social frailty, one of the most troubling and potentially devastating threats to healthy adult ageing, referring broadly to lack of social support or social engagement. This PhD project will provide the first test of how age-related changes in the abilities that allow us to perceive, interpret and process social information drive resilience and risk for this important threat to healthy ageing, and then leverage these data to create a training tool that directly targets those abilities identified as being most strongly linked to social frailty. The supervisory team integrates the skills and expertise of psychologists in the fields of geropsychology/developmental psychology (Prof. Henry and Dr. Sarah Grainger), social psychology (Prof. Bill von Hippel, and A/Prof. Eric Vanman), as well as clinicians working in the fields of geriatrics (Prof. Ruth Hubbard), allied health (Prof. Liisa Laakso), and neuroscience (Dr. Daniel Schweitzer).

Applications will be judged on a competitive basis taking into account the applicant's previous academic record, publication record, honours and awards, and employment history.

A working knowledge of psychology, and in particular cognitive ageing or social neuroscience, would be of benefit to someone working on this project.

The applicant will demonstrate academic achievement in the field(s) of psychology or related discipline and the potential for scholastic success.

*The successful candidate must commence by Research Quarter 4, 2023. You should apply at least 3 months prior to the research quarter commencement date. International applicants may need to apply much earlier for visa reasons.

Professor Deanna Kemp

d.kemp@smi.uq.edu.au

Privately-commissioned public inquiry processes in large-scale mining projects

This PhD project is part of an Australian Research Council (ARC) Linkage Grant based out of UQ on privately-commissioned public inquiry processes in large-scale mining projects. These types of inquiries have been commissioned and sponsored by global extractive companies on a voluntary basis following public allegations of environmental impacts and human rights abuses, including impacts on Indigenous and tribal peoples’ rights. This particular type of inquiry holds potential for breakthrough research on deep-seated issues, but little is known about their governance and whether they actually drive industry change. 

This ARC Linkage Project will investigate the value of these inquiries for different stakeholder groups, and draw lessons for future inquiries. The research is a multi-party collaboration between UQ, Australian National University (ANU), Denver-based global mining giant, Newmont Corporation, and international non-government organisation, RESOLVE, based in Washington DC.

The research question motivating this project is: How can privately-commissioned inquiries drive meaningful change in the global extractives sector? The project will focus on understanding which structures and procedural approaches generate which types of change across different stakeholder groups. The project aims to undertake comparative analysis between government-commissioned and company-commissioned inquiries, examination of different types of privately-commissioned inquiries and case studies, and the production of guidelines, principles or pre-conditions that may assist different parties to decide how to initiate, invest in or engage in these processes.

The Centre for Social Responsibility in Mining (CSRM) is seeking a PhD student to conduct and coordinate some of this work. The successful candidate will have the opportunity to contribute to scholarly publications and a public set of end-user focused outputs – such as a set of guidelines or recommendations as to how the industry, and other stakeholders, might approach these inquiries in the future. The student will be integrated in to the project team and will focus on defined and achievable components of the project including: (i) surfacing lessons from public commission of inquiry, and (ii) analysing industry case studies. This will offer the student a unique opportunity to develop their skills in applied, industry-facing, integrated mixed methods research with a team of leading global experts and practitioners.

The candidate will benefit from the applied research environment at UQ’s Centre for Social Responsibility in Mining (CSRM) in the Sustainable Minerals Institute (SMI), a world-leading research institute. They will also collaborate with the Institute of Social Science Research (ISSR) as well as the applied work of industrial inquiry practitioner and disaster scholar Andrew Hopkins from the Australian National University’s (ANU) College of Arts and Social Sciences. 

The research will be based at CSRM. The Centre focuses on the social, cultural, economic and political challenges that occur when change is brought about by mineral resource extraction and contributes to industry change through independent research, teaching and by convening and participating in multi-stakeholder dialogue processes. The student will work closely with the CSRM research team, which consists of leading global experts in mining and resettlement, community relations, governance, agreements, development, cultural heritage, human rights, Indigenous peoples, mine closure, conflict and gender. They will be working in a strong and diverse student community of PhD and HDR students from across the world, with an opportunity to collaborate with other SMI Centres and the wider University.

Applications will be judged on a competitive basis taking into account the applicant's previous academic record, publication record, honours and awards, and employment history.

A working knowledge of the extractives industry and/or the global extractives sector would be of benefit to someone working on this project.

The applicant will demonstrate academic achievement in the field(s) of social sciences and applied research methods and the potential for scholastic success.

*The successful candidate must commence by Research Quarter 3, 2021. You should apply at least 3 months prior to the research quarter commencement date. International applicants may need to apply much earlier for visa reasons.

Professor Karen Nankervis

k.nankervis@uq.edu.au

“We need to talk”: Social and ethical dialogue around genomics and disability

“We need to talk”: Social and ethical dialogue around genomics and disability is a major Medical Research Futures Fund (MRFF) project grant in relation to the ethical, legal, and social issues related to genomics in health care. This MRFF funded project aims to a) articulate the ethical, social and legal issues of genomics for people with disabilities and their families; and, b) implement a collaborative, co-design model to inform the design and conduct of human genetic research as well as genomics policy, research, education and practices.

This research project will provide a voice for people with disabilities and their families with a key focus on the impact of genomics on the identity of people with disabilities and their presence in society. An understanding of the impact of genomics on the lives of people with disabilities is similarly beneficial for scientists, clinicians and policy makers who will be included in this project.  A shared understanding and dialogue to bring together these critical perspectives of the ethical, social and legal aspects of genomics is a critical activity of this project.

Applications will be judged on a competitive basis taking into account the applicant's previous academic record, publication record, honours and awards, and employment history.

A working knowledge of working collaboratively across disciplines and stakeholders, working with people with disabilities, and translation of research into practice would be of benefit to someone working on this project.

The applicant will demonstrate academic achievement in the field(s) of social sciences, specifically in relation to disability, and the potential for scholastic success.

A background or knowledge of lived experience of disability is highly desirable.

*The successful candidate must commence by Research Quarter 3, 2021. You should apply at least 3 months prior to the research quarter commencement date. International applicants may need to apply much earlier for visa reasons.

Dr Aude Bernard

a.bernard@uq.edu.au

Where migrants go: A study of immigrant’s post-arrival moves in Australia

Migration within Australia is a key driver of economic, demographic and social change. Recognising the growing diversity of immigrants, including the rapid rise in temporary migration, the project aims to establish the geographical and occupational trajectories of different migrant groups after arrival in Australia. It seeks to improve understanding of the incidence, spatial patterns and drivers of migrants’ movement within Australia and the sociodemographic impact on regions and individuals. As part of this project, the PhD student will work on developing subnational projections of immigrant groups.

A first class Honours, Master or equivalent with a background Geography, Demography, Epidemiology, Population studies or related discipline. Experience in quantitative analysis and modelling and sound knowledge of R, Stata or equivalent.

*The successful candidate must commence by Research Quarter 3, 2021. You should apply at least 3 months prior to the research quarter commencement date. International applicants may need to apply much earlier for visa reasons.

Dr Nathan Evans

nathan.evans@uq.edu.au

Beyond Response Time and Choice: Understanding Changes of Mind in Decisions

Seeking applicants for a scholarship to undertake a PhD position with Dr Nathan Evans as part of a recently funded ARC DECRA project, which focuses on response time models of human decision-making. The project aims to provide novel experimental insight into how people change their minds during decisions, through identifying the cognitive architecture that reflects the behaviour that we observe from people. The project provides a substantially deeper understanding of the cognitive decision process and how it changes over time, as opposed to previous research focusing on only the final response that people make. The expected outcome is a comprehensive understanding of the human decision process through cognitive models that provide an accurate reflection of this mental process.

The successful applicant will enrol through the School of Psychology.

Applications are invited from domestic and international students with first class honours (or equivalent) in Psychology, or disciplines related to computational modelling such as computer science or statistics. Desirable experience, in no particularly order, includes:

  1. conducting experimental research,
  2. writing experimental code in JavaScript or Python,
  3. performing advanced computational modelling techniques (e.g., Bayesian hierarchical models),
  4. writing analysis code in R, preferably in base R,
  5. a very basic knowledge of C, and
  6. writing scientific literature.

Please note that the successful applicant will not necessarily have experience in all of these areas, though a willingness to develop these skills during the PhD program is desirable.

*The successful candidate must commence by Research Quarter 3, 2021. You should apply at least 3 months prior to the research quarter commencement date. International applicants may need to apply much earlier for visa reasons.

Associate Professor David Pritchard

d.pritchard@uq.edu.au

Ancient Athens at War

This category-1 PhD position will launch a stunning research career. This opportunity is open to all-interested students anywhere in the world. It is fully funded. The total value of this ARC-generated position is 152,000€ / £127,000 / $AU253,000.

You will join a large international team of leading Greek historians under the direction of Professor Ian Worthington (Macquarie University [Sydney]) and Associate Professor David M. Pritchard (The University of Queensland [Brisbane]). Our project is funded by the Australian Research Council (ARC). The project (grant no. DP200101253) aims to transform our understanding of ancient Athens from c. 630 to 321 BC.

As the Chief Investigators of this ARC project we are especially looking for a first-rate doctoral researcher to study Athenian politics and warfare before 508 BC. This would be your chance to adjudicate the famous Frost–Van Wees debate and to write the book on archaic Athens. We would also be interested in considering research proposals about politics and warfare in Athens after 508 BC.

This is a truly international search. There are no citizenship restrictions on applicants. The basic requirement is a BA Hons or MPhil in Ancient History or Classics. Formal training in classical Greek and a reading knowledge of French and/or German would be big advantages. You will write your PhD thesis under the direct supervision of David Pritchard at the University of Queensland in Brisbane (Australia).

*The successful candidate must commence by Research Quarter 2, 2021. You should apply at least 3 months prior to the research quarter commencement date. International applicants may need to apply much earlier for visa reasons.

Dr Elin Charles-Edwards

e.charles-edwards@uq.edu.au

Understanding the dynamics of temporary migration in Asia

Rapid progress through the demographic transition in most Asian countries has resulted in migration becoming the leading agent of demographic change in the region. However, the dynamics of movement, both permanent and temporary, remain poorly understood. This PhD project will explore the dynamics of temporary migration both within and between selected countries of Asia. The project will draw on a range of secondary data sets including census microdata and large scale surveys to conceptualise temporary mobility and develop robust metrics for its measurement. The project will yield fundamental knowledge of the scale, timing and patterns of temporary population mobility in Asia.

Applicants should hold a research-based Honours or Masters degree in a relevant field such as geography, economics or demography and have experience in quantitative analysis and modelling in R, Stata or equivalent software. The role would suit an individual with enthusiasm for discovery and dissemination of research. Authorship of publications or other evidence of independent research an advantage

*The successful candidate must commence by Research Quarter 1, 2021. You should apply at least 3 months prior to the research quarter commencement date. International applicants may need to apply much earlier for visa reasons.

Associate Professor Marco Faravelli

m.faravelli@uq.edu.au

Experiments in Political Economics

The PhD candidate will work on experiments in political economics under the supervision of the advisory team. S/he will develop and learn to use different experimental economics methods related to lab, online and field experiments. By the end of the PhD, the candidate will be capable of working independently and be an autonomous and integral part of the research team.  

Master/Honours degree in economics.

*The successful candidate must commence by Research Quarter 3, 2020. You should apply at least 3 months prior to the research quarter commencement date. International applicants may need to apply much earlier for visa reasons.

Associate Professor Paul Spee

p.spee@business.uq.edu.au

and

Dr Anna Jenkins

a.jenkins@business.uq.edu.au

High-impact entrepreneurship: routine formation, process and outcomes

Innovation-led growth will take an increasingly central role in Australia’s economic development. To foster such growth requires an in-depth understanding of high-impact entrepreneurship. To achieve this understanding the research adopts a practice-based approach to gain in-depth knowledge of what entrepreneurs actually do in the process of creating high impact new ventures. As an outcome, how routines are formed and developed to establish and sustain the creation of high-impact new ventures are uncovered; making significant contributions to core areas of management and entrepreneurship research, while providing sound guidance to entrepreneurs, industry and policy makers about the process of creating high impact new ventures.

The successful applicant will enrol through the School of Business.

Honours or Master’s degree or equivalent

*This project is available until December 2019 unless a suitable candidate is found prior.

Professor Peter Renshaw

p.renshaw@uq.edu.au
Digital mediation of children’s interaction with the more-than-human world

Contemporary society is saturated with digital devices that are transforming children’s play activities, their social relationships and their interactions with the "natural" world. This project investigates how children deploy digital devices to interact with the "natural" world and how this influences their literate practices, emotional engagement and identities. These issues are investigated longitudinally across countries, Australia and Finland, and in relation to key contextual issues of social class, material conditions, and pedagogical approach. Through a children's learning commission on how to use digital devices sustainably, children become researchers of how to mitigate the effects of human activity on the "natural" world.

The successful applicant will enrol through the School of Education.

Bachelor Honours or eligible Masters degree in Education

*The successful candidate must commence by Research Quarter 2, 2020. You should apply at least 3 months prior to the research quarter commencement date. International applicants may need to apply much earlier for visa reasons. 

Dr Rebecca Olive

r.olive@uq.edu.au
Understanding ecological sensibilities in recreational lifestyle sport

This research aims to understand environmental attitudes and behaviours that emerge through participation in recreational lifestyle sports. Linking the growth of lifestyle sports in Australia and the recent research focus on oceans, this research will highlight how surfers, ocean swimmers and other ‘bluesports’ participants develop relationships to, and produce knowledge about, oceans and coasts. It is interested in everyday cultural practices relating to ethical consumption, including through social media, and will provide key insights for bluesports communities to enable them to make better choices about their attitudes and practices relating to sustainable oceans and coasts. 

The successful applicant will enrol through the School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences.

Cultural Studies, Environmental Humanities, Leisure Studies, Sociology of Sport, Gender Studies, Postcolonial Studies.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander candidates are encouraged to apply.

Please contact the Chief Investigator to check on this project's availability.

Professor Murray Phillips

m.phillips@uq.edu.au
Pride, Resilience and Identity: Reimagining Aboriginal Sport History

This project aims to investigate the links between sport, community and identity in Aboriginal communities in Queensland, NSW and the Northern Territory during the twentieth century (with a focus on Cherbourg, La Perouse, Redfern and Yuendumu). A focus will be on how and why communities, both individually and collectively, engaged with sport, and the meaning of sport in these communities.

The successful applicant will enrol through the School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences.

An Honours degree or equivalent background in history or Indigenous Studies.

Please contact the Chief Investigator to check on this project's availability.