Available PhD projects - Humanities, education, psychology, music, business, law & social sciences

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Chief Investigator

Project title

Project description

Preferred educational background

Professor Leanne Hides

l.hides@uq.edu.au

Early intervention for Primary and Comorbid Substance Use in Young People

The Lives Lived Well (LLW) Research Group is located in the School of Psychology and is part of the Centre for Youth Substance Abuse Research (CYSAR) at The University of Queensland (UQ). UQ has a collaborative research partnership with LLW, a not-for-profit organisation supporting people impacted by alcohol, drugs and/or mental health problems with more than 30 locations across regional NSW and Queensland

 Our group aims to conduct applied and translational research to increase understanding and improve the treatment of primary substance use and comorbid mental health issues. 

The successful applicant will enrol through the School of Psychology.

Honours degree in Psychology

*The successful candidate must commence by Research Quarter 1, 2020. You should apply at least 3 months prior to the research quarter commencement date. International applicants may need to apply much earlier for visa reasons. 

Associate Professor Paul Spee

p.spee@business.uq.edu.au

and

Dr Anna Jenkins

a.jenkins@business.uq.edu.au

High-impact entrepreneurship: routine formation, process and outcomes

Innovation-led growth will take an increasingly central role in Australia’s economic development. To foster such growth requires an in-depth understanding of high-impact entrepreneurship. To achieve this understanding the research adopts a practice-based approach to gain in-depth knowledge of what entrepreneurs actually do in the process of creating high impact new ventures. As an outcome, how routines are formed and developed to establish and sustain the creation of high-impact new ventures are uncovered; making significant contributions to core areas of management and entrepreneurship research, while providing sound guidance to entrepreneurs, industry and policy makers about the process of creating high impact new ventures.

The successful applicant will enrol through the School of Business.

Honours or Master’s degree or equivalent

*This project is available until December 2019 unless a suitable candidate is found prior.

Dr Justine Bell-James

j.bell-james@law.uq.edu.au

A model national legal framework for mangrove ecosystem services

The ARC project: The rapid rate of mangrove loss globally is of great concern due to the critically important ecosystem services these coastal environments provide. The Australian coast is significantly lined with these plants (18%), making it important that our national and state legal frameworks efficiently manage and protect these valuable resources. This project aims to identify current legal deficiencies, and policy barriers, and canvas expert opinion to generate consensus for an innovative legal framework that recognises and protects the multiple ecosystem services provided by mangroves. It is anticipated the framework will be adaptable to provide significant benefits to other ecosystems and jurisdictions.

The PhD project: The PhD project will involve a comparative analysis of existing legal recognition of ecosystem services for United States wetlands. The candidate, in collaboration with Dr Bell-James, can determine the specific parameters of the study. 

The successful applicant will enrol through the School of Law.

Must have an undergraduate Honours degree in Law.

Background in science, ecology and/or conservation would be highly beneficial.

*The successful candidate must commence by Research Quarter 1, 2020. You should apply at least 3 months prior to the research quarter commencement date. International applicants may need to apply much earlier for visa reasons. ​

Dr Aude Bernard

a.bernard@uq.edu.au

Understanding the long-term decline in internal migration

Internal migration rates have declined continuously since the 1970s in most advanced economies, including Australia. This decline in human mobility has potentially profound implications for the functioning of the economy and for individuals’ aspirations, but remains poorly recognised and understood. This project aims to establish the onset and pace of the migration decline for a global sample of countries. It also seeks to identify the causes of this change by identifying linkages between the drop in migration rates and the broader socio-demographic transitions of the past 30 years in countries of interest to PhD students involved in this project.

The successful applicant will enrol through the School of Earth and Environmental Sciences.

Social science, economics, geography, sociology, demography.